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BevPac 

BevPac, Political Action Fund. Funds are dedicated for Arizona political campaign contributions and other lawful purposes. For Information on the Pac CLICK HERE.
DONATIONS THROUGH THIS WEBSITE CAN BE ONLY PERSONAL CREDIT CARD.

 

Membership 

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What is a PAC?

In the U.S., a political action committee (PAC) is a popular term for a type of organization that pools campaign contributions from members and donates those funds to campaign for legislation, ballot initiatives, or for spending money for campaign spending or on political competition to elect and defeat candidates who are dedicated to supporting and representing the interests of a particular group or special interest.


ALBA through the PAC therefore helps to protect the investment of adult beverage retailers and makes possible benefits that cannot be achieved by individuals operating alone. As an independent PAC, Arizona Licensed Beverage Association legally may solicit contributions from the general public and must pay their own costs from those funds.


About PAC Funding:At the U.S. federal level, an organization becomes a PAC when it receives or spends more than $2,600 for the purpose of influencing a federal election, according to the Federal Election Campaign Act

At the state level, an organization becomes a PAC according to the state's election laws.

PACs can give $5,000 to a candidate committee per election (primary, general or special). They can also give up to $15,000 annually to any national party committee, and $5,000 annually to any other PAC. PACs may receive up to $5,000 from any one individual, PAC or party committee per calendar year. A PAC must be registered with the FEC (Federal Election Commission), providing name and address for the PAC, its treasurer and any connected organizations. Affiliated PACs are treated as one donor for the purpose of contribution limits.

The History: PACs have been around since 1944, when the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO) formed the first one to raise money for the re-election of President Franklin D. Roosevelt. The PAC's money came from voluntary contributions from union members rather than union treasuries, so it did not violate the Smith Connally Act of 1943, which forbade unions from contributing to federal candidates. Although commonly called PACs, federal election law refers to these accounts as "separate segregated funds" because money contributed to a PAC is kept in a bank account separate from the general corporate or union treasury.

Many politicians also form Leadership PACs as a way of raising money to help fund other candidates' campaigns. Since June 2008, Leadership PACs reporting electronically must list the candidate sponsoring the PAC, as per the Honest Leadership and Open Government Act of 2007. Leadership PACs are often indicative of a politician's aspirations for leadership positions in Congress or for higher office.

Expansive information about Pac’s can be found on Wikipedia at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Political_action_committee

The ALBA “BevPac” was established for the purpose of representing and initiating a lobby effort for the support of laws that preserve the right of all Arizona retail liquor licensees.